50 million people worldwide in modern slavery: ILO

by IANS |

Geneva, Sep 13 (IANS) In its latest report, the Geneva-based International Labour Organization (ILO) said that 50 million people were living in modern slavery in 2021.

According to the latest report by the UN agency titled, 'Global Estimates of Modern Slavery', 28 million of these people were in forced labour and 22 million were trapped in forced marriage.

The number of people in modern slavery has risen significantly in the last five years -- 10 million more people were in modern slavery in 2021 compared to 2016 global estimates.

Women and children remain disproportionately vulnerable, says the report.

Modern slavery occurs in almost every country in the world, and cuts across ethnic, cultural and religious lines. More than half (52 per cent) of all forced labour and a quarter of all forced marriages can be found in upper-middle income or high-income countries.

Regarding forced labour, most cases (86 per cent) are found in the private sector.

According to the report, forced labour in sectors other than commercial sexual exploitation accounts for 63 per cent of all forced labour, while forced commercial sexual exploitation represents 23 per cent of all forced labour.

Almost four out of five of those in forced commercial sexual exploitation are women or girls.

State-imposed forced labour accounts for 14 per cent of people in forced labour.

Almost one in eight of all those in forced labour are children (3.3 million). More than half of these are in commercial sexual exploitation.

The report says that an estimated 22 million people were living in forced marriage on any given day in 2021 -- an increase of 6.6 million since the 2016 global estimates.

"It is shocking that the situation of modern slavery is not improving. Nothing can justify the persistence of this fundamental abuse of human rights," said ILO Director-General, Guy Ryder.

Antonio Vitorino, IOM Director-General, said: "This report underscores the urgency of ensuring that all migration is safe, orderly, and regular. Reducing the vulnerability of migrants to forced labour and trafficking in persons depends first and foremost on national policy and legal frameworks that respect, protect, and fulfil the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all migrants, and potential migrants, at all stages of the migration process, regardless of their migration status."

Latest News
In leaked audio, Shehbaz Sharif being told that Maryam's son-in-law wants Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:30 PM
Pakistan could import wheat from Russia: Shehbaz Sharif Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:29 PM
Delhi HC hauls up Axis Bank for breach of undertaking in Pune-Satara toll road case Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:27 PM
Look for opportunities to buy on dips Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:26 PM
NFT startups shun Apple App Store due to high commission, tough rules Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:21 PM
3rd T20I: Bhuvi back in playing XI as India win the toss and elect to bowl first against Australia Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:19 PM
Kenya's Kipchoge breaks own world record to win 2022 Berlin marathon Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:18 PM
India claim bronze on debut at women's International Tent Pegging Championship Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:17 PM
Deepti had all the 'rights' to run out Charlie Dean, says Anjum Chopra Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:16 PM
Hope I have been successful in inspiring the next generation: Jhulan Goswami Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 08:15 PM
Other states keen in learning about Dravidian development: Stalin Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 07:46 PM
If any of MLAs who went to Manesar is made CM, govt may fall: Gehlot camp minister Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 07:45 PM
International kidnapping racket busted in Kolkata, three arrested Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 07:44 PM
Property attached in J&K's Bandipora for wilfully sheltering militants Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 07:41 PM
Muslim scholars seek ban on singing 'bhajans', 'Surya Namaskar' in Kashmir schools Sun, Sep 25, 2022, 07:40 PM